About Stem Cell

Stem cells reside in adult bone marrow and fat, as well as other tissues and organs of the body. These cells have a natural ability to repair damaged tissue, however in people with degenerative diseases they are not released quickly enough to fully repair damaged tissue. In the case of fat stem cells they may not be released at all. The process of actively extracting, concentrating and administering these stem cells has been shown in clinical trials to have beneficial effects in degenerative conditions. We offerpatients and their doctors access to these therapies now.

We offer treatments using both autologous (your own) stem cells and/or third party donor cells.

  • Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Therapy 
  • Platelet­Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Therapy 

By Sally Robertson, B.Sc. 

Reviewed by Susha Cheriyedath, M.Sc.

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Therapy 

Complications 

Since PRP is produced using a patient’s own blood, there is very little chance of a reaction occurring. However, as with any injection, there is a minimal risk of infection and injury to nerves and tissues in the area. 

Effectiveness 

Researchers are currently carrying out studies to assess the effectiveness of PRP, which can vary depending on the injury site being treated, as well as the patient’s overall health and whether the injury is acute or chronic. The areas where PRP is currently being studied as a therapy are discussed below. 

Chronic Tendon Injuries 

According to the research currently reported, PRP is an effective treatment for chronic tendon injuries, particularly the common injury “tennis elbow.” PRP has also showed promise as a treatment for other chronic tendon injuries including Achilles tendonitis and jumper’s knee (inflammation or injury of the patellar in the knee). However, whether PRP is more effective than conventional treatments is yet to be established. 

Acute Injury to Ligaments and Muscles 

PRP has received a lot of publicity for its potential in treating acute sports injuries. It has been used to treat common injuries among athletes such as pulled hamstring muscles and knee sprains, although no conclusive evidence is currently published that proves PRP enhances healing in these injuries. 

Surgery 

PRP has also been used during some kinds of surgery, to aid tissue healing. It was initially thought to be of benefit in surgery that corrects tears in rotator cuff tendons and knee ligaments. However, to date, studies have been unable to show any significant benefit of applying PRP in these types of procedures. 

Knee arthritis

Read More Here

 

Although blood mainly consists of a liquid called plasma, it also contains a number of other components including red cells, white cells, and platelets. Platelets circulate in the blood and play a crucial role in blood clotting. They also contain proteins called growth factors, which are needed to stimulate the healing of injuries. 

Platelet­rich plasma (PRP) is plasma produced from a person’s blood that has a much higher platelet concentration than usual. The platelet concentration and therefore growth factor concentration in PRP can be three to five times greater than would usually be present in the blood. 

Injection of this PRP, enriched with platelets and growth factors, is becoming a popular option for boosting the body’s natural healing process in cases of injury to the tendons, ligaments, joints, cartilage, bone, and muscles. In some cases, PRP therapy can reduce the need for medication or surgical approaches to musculoskeletal problems. Although researchers are not sure exactly how PRP injection therapy works, studies have shown that the enriched concentration of growth factors in PRP has the potential to increase the speed at which healing occurs. 

Preparation and Injection of PRP 

To prepare PRP, a patient’s blood sample is spun in a centrifuge to separate the platelets from other blood components and produce platelet­rich plasma that can be collected and treated. The PRP preparation is applied to the injury site via an injection, which may be administered under the guidance of ultrasound or X­ray, to ensure PRP placement is precise. A single injection or a series of injections may be recommended, depending on the injury being treated and how the patient responds to initial therapy. 

Once the injection has been given, the patient must avoid exercise or weight­ bearing activity for 3 to 7 days, before gradually returning to their usual physical activities. For the period immediately following injection, a doctor may recommend the use of a cast, boot, or brace. 

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Therapy 

Some preliminary studies have looked at the effectiveness of PRP in treating the arthritic knee, but it is still too soon to know whether PRP will be any more beneficial than current therapies. 

Fractures 

So far, no studies have shown PRP to be of any significant benefit in accelerating the healing of fractures. 

In conclusion, although PRP does seem to be a beneficial treatment for patients with chronic tendon injuries, further research is needed before the effectiveness of PRP in other conditions can be determined. 

Sources 

https://www.hss.edu/conditions_platelet­rich­plasma­prp.asp

https://www.hss.edu/condition­list_prp­injections.asp www.aofas.org/…/Platelet­rich­Plasma­Injections.aspx

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00648 

Further Reading 

All Lymphadenopathy Content 

What is Lymphadenopathy? 

Lymphadenopathy Management 

Last Updated: Feb 27, 2019 

Written by 

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Therapy 

Sally Robertson 

Sally has a Bachelor’s Degree in Biomedical Sciences (B.Sc.). She is a specialist in reviewing and summarising the latest findings across all areas of medicine covered in major, high­impact, world­leading international medical journals, international press conferences and bulletins from governmental agencies and regulatory bodies. At News­Medical, Sally generates daily news features, life science articles and interview coverage. 

https://www.news-medical.net/health/Platelet-Rich-Plasma-(PRP)-Injection-Therapy.aspx P

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Therapy 

Complications 

Since PRP is produced using a patient’s own blood, there is very little chance of a reaction occurring. However, as with any injection, there is a minimal risk of infection and injury to nerves and tissues in the area. 

Effectiveness 

Researchers are currently carrying out studies to assess the effectiveness of PRP, which can vary depending on the injury site being treated, as well as the patient’s overall health and whether the injury is acute or chronic. The areas where PRP is currently being studied as a therapy are discussed below. 

Chronic Tendon Injuries 

According to the research currently reported, PRP is an effective treatment for chronic tendon injuries, particularly the common injury “tennis elbow.” PRP has also showed promise as a treatment for other chronic tendon injuries including Achilles tendonitis and jumper’s knee (inflammation or injury of the patellar in the knee). However, whether PRP is more effective than conventional treatments is yet to be established. 

Acute Injury to Ligaments and Muscles 

PRP has received a lot of publicity for its potential in treating acute sports injuries. It has been used to treat common injuries among athletes such as pulled hamstring muscles and knee sprains, although no conclusive evidence is currently published that proves PRP enhances healing in these injuries. 

Surgery 

PRP has also been used during some kinds of surgery, to aid tissue healing. It was initially thought to be of benefit in surgery that corrects tears in rotator cuff tendons and knee ligaments. However, to date, studies have been unable to show any significant benefit of applying PRP in these types of procedures. 

Knee arthritis 

Saved from URL: https://www.news-medical.net/health/Platelet-Rich-Plasma-(PRP)-Injection-Therapy.aspx

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Therapy 

Some preliminary studies have looked at the effectiveness of PRP in treating the arthritic knee, but it is still too soon to know whether PRP will be any more beneficial than current therapies. 

Fractures 

So far, no studies have shown PRP to be of any significant benefit in accelerating the healing of fractures. 

In conclusion, although PRP does seem to be a beneficial treatment for patients with chronic tendon injuries, further research is needed before the effectiveness of PRP in other conditions can be determined. 

Sources 

https://www.hss.edu/conditions_platelet­rich­plasma­prp.asp

https://www.hss.edu/condition­list_prp­injections.asp www.aofas.org/…/Platelet­rich­Plasma­Injections.aspx

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00648 

Further Reading 

All Lymphadenopathy Content 

What is Lymphadenopathy? 

Lymphadenopathy Management 

Last Updated: Feb 27, 2019 

Written by 

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Therapy 

Sally Robertson 

Sally has a Bachelor’s Degree in Biomedical Sciences (B.Sc.). She is a specialist in reviewing and summarising the latest findings across all areas of medicine covered in major, high­impact, world­leading international medical journals, international press conferences and bulletins from governmental agencies and regulatory bodies. At News­Medical, Sally generates daily news features, life science articles and interview coverage. 

https://www.news-medical.net/health/Platelet-Rich-Plasma-(PRP)-Injection-Therapy.aspx P

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